Monday, September 5, 2011

THE FUTURE OF OUR BIRDS: WATER CONSERVATION BY PHYLLIS

Welcome to  Magnificent Monday and let's have a great week with our words and photographs on conservation!!!


Being a nature photographer, I'm constantly reminded of the value of birds. Sometimes when I drive through my neighborhood in the late afternoon, I watch a Great Blue Heron wading by the shore. For those few moments, I am transported from life's petty annoyances into a peaceful calm. At other times, when I see a family of wood storks crossing the greens of the golf course, I marvel at the similarities to human child rearing skills they display.

What compelled me to write this blog today is my concern that humans in their quest for more of everything will sacrifice the one thing that makes the quest worthwhile: the leisure time to enjoy the natural world of which birds are a vital part. Whether it's the land, water or air that we share, humans must continue having those difficult conversations to figure out a way to get what we need (not want) while saving our natural environment. This is my idea of conservation.

According the national statistics, it is predicted that Florida’s human population may double to 36 million in the next fifty years. If that happens, about 7 million acres of land could be converted from rural and natural to urban uses. If we develop—as we have in the past—roads, shopping malls and subdivisions will replace the rich diversity that our landscape currently offers. Development will also impact our coastal waters and coral reefs.


Since birds feed and breed in these environments, their longevity is threatened. Water levels, climate changes and the amount of wetland habitats impact how birds survive and human consumption is the reason. Even though several federal, state and local agencies and conservation commissions are making plans, the average citizen needs to be thinking and acting, as well. 


I know what some people say. What can I do? I'm only one person. Well, let's just think about water for a minute. Did you know the average person uses about 124 gallons of water a day? Multiply that by eighteen million people (just in Florida) and that's 2 billion, 232 million gallons of water!!! The number is so high, you can't even picture it in your mind. Just imagine, it's enough to fill every swimming pool, every two seconds, all day, every day.
WOW!!


Just by making a few changes in your home, you can help save water for our environment. Here are some ways:


1) Repairing a dripping faucet, can save 30 gallons a day.
2) Repairing a leaky toilet, can save 100 gallons a day.
3) Well maintained and efficient clothes washers can use 27 gallons 
    of water a day. Older less maintained washers, use 56.
4) Rinsing fruit and vegetables in a bowl instead of under a running 
    faucet, saves 250 gallons a month.
5) Turning off the faucet while brushing your teeth and shaving,  
     saves 1000 gallons a month.
6) Running a hose uses 9 gallons a minute. If you leave it 
    on for an hour, you use 540 gallons of water.


These are just a few facts to put human water consumption into perspective. But how does conserving our water supply help birds?
Water conserving efforts result in diverting less water from rivers, bays and wetlands which allows more water to remain in its natural setting. Since fish, wildlife and birds depend upon these water resources to nest and make babies, the less we use, the more that's available for future generations. 


Well, that's my opinion on one aspect conservation. For now, just remember. When you, your children and your children's children have the time to enjoy your surroundings, make sure there is something to see. Birds are amazing creatures and we should do everything we can to protect them. Enjoy the images!


Check out the others bloggers contributing to Marvelous Mondays;


http://holesinmysoles.blogspot.com/



























28 comments:

Rimly said...

Jim that was a very thoughtful post. I try and follow all the points that you suggest to conserve water. While I was in the hostel we used to go through such water shortage that preserving water has become a part of me. I even go looking for leaky water pipes around the house. Thank you for sharing this.

http://rimlybezbaruah.blogspot.com/2011/09/our-truthsoul-mates.html

Nelieta said...

What a great contribution to nature conservation Jim! You know we lived without running water for more than a year until we finally got municipal water. We used to buy water from the Fire brigade and they would pump it into a tank for us. During that time we learnt how to save water. It sounds like a difficult thing to do but it is not. We used every drop and just by making small changes we managed to make permanent changes to our way of living. Thank you for creating an awareness!

Nelieta said...

Sorry, I forgot to leave my link!

http://nelietatravellingadventures.blogspot.com/2011/09/magnificent-monday-nature-conservation.html

Tameka said...

Hi Phyllis! This was a very informative post. We must do everything we can to save the birds! I'm doing my part, but I can get better. I do tend to run the water while brushing. Thanks for the reminder. Also, the photos of the birds are amazing! I love the pink ones and the ones where we can see their eyes. So much personality there. Let's save the birds! :-)

http://lyricfire.typepad.com/lyric-fire/2011/09/lyric-fire-searching-for-true-a-poetic-trilogy-in-reverse-part-i.html

Judie said...

Jim, you have a photo of two Snowy Egrets leading into your gallery of prints. I would like to put that photo on my blog.

Thanks for your comment on my post. The post is a continuation of a short story that I began several weeks ago for a Saturday Centus, in case you would like to catch up. Just go to the Centus with the prompt "I'm pregnant!" and you will see links, in yellow, to other chapters of the story.

I look forward to posting one of your beautiful photos on my blog!!
My email is rogueartist@q.com

Alpana Jaiswal said...

Its always a pleasure to be here,u are making your posts so interesting and informative....loving it...and this one is really important for all of us.

Jan said...

Guess I got my Mondays mixed up. Never heard about this one,oops. Loved your post, such an important matter,conservation of our water.

Cathy Sweeney said...

When you lay out the facts like that, the numbers are really shocking. I know I can do better about conserving water and will do so. Your photos are really beautiful!

Larry Lewis said...

What awesome pictures. It was like being transported to a magnificent place seeing such beautiful birds in their natural habitat. It is so frightening that in our so called advanced technological age we see so many species of animals virtually been killed off. The most wonderful thing we have is nature and it needs to be treated with more responsibility. I'm joining you on the soap box

Jim said...

Thanks Phylis, making us think about water and how we use it without compromising wildlife is a very thoughtful post for conservation. Those photos really do show up how beautiful birdlife is.

Portia said...

lovely photographs with impressive text.Thanks for the eye-feast,Jim!
-PORTIA

JIM said...

Thank You all especially Phyllis who took over the blog while I am fighting a nasty cold!! I thought she did a great job and I really enjoyed reading it!!

lakwatsera de primera said...

It was nice to be reminded about these simple and practical tips that we often overlook. I also do my own share of water conservation but I will follow your new tips as well.

melissa said...

I could definitely tell that it's you Phyllis... there's a special element that you incorporate in your images and posts that gives the blog a more subtle touch ;)...

While we all think we have water in abundance and continue wasting it... we lose sight of the future generation who'll benefit from what water offers not only to us humans but also for all the creatures that share the world with us.

It's definitely worth reflecting on and we do need to act upon it.

I loved every image you posted...I liked how you magnified the birds... the angles by which you took them. Bellissime sono!

Thank you for gracing Jim's blog once in a while. You maintain a good balance. I love your post;)

Alejandro said...

water is life.. life is water

A

JP Brandano Photography said...

I appreciate everyone taking the time to comment on this important topic. I love being a nature photographer and I worry that in the future, some of these beautiful creatures may be missing.
I'm glad so many of you found the 'what we can do' tips helpful. Thanks so much for caring!!!

Jeffrey Scott said...

Love the bird photos. Glad I found my way to your blog. Will be looking at some of the other sets also. Cheers!

Techmaker said...

As always great work form JIM. Always like your pictures.

Rachel Hoyt said...

Beautiful photos! I love watching birds in the wild. Thanks for encouraging us all to conserve and make sure we keep this world able to care for all of us! Feel free to link in to my Smiley Sociology Study on rare animals as well. :)

Chintan said...

Jim, those are some wonderful photos and a very thoughtful post indeed....

David said...

Jim beautiful eye-catching photos as always!! Thanks for sharing the water conservation tips as surely one day it will run out if we don't do our part today. I try to save but thanks for the reminder that we must all do more!!

http://erinsdomain.blogspot.com

BlogNostics said...

Jim,

You make me love love Florida. If only I could live my life through your lens..... Beautiful shoots my friend.

We need to take care and conserve our water resources otherwise we will lose all that is beautiful in the world..

xoxox
jessica

Mari Sterling Wilbur said...

Wow! Interesting statistics we should all pay attention to! Love the Flamingo photos - they are one of my fave birds - the colors here are spectacular.

JIM said...

Actually I think your referring to the Spoonies!!

Thank You
Jim

InsideJourneys said...

It all adds up, doesn't it? Thanks for sharing this information. Your photos are absolutely beautiful.

Nancie said...

Beautiful shots Jim, and thought provoking post. Korea is known for having some of the best wetlands in the world. Sadly, it might not be for much longer. The country has been on a mission to revitalize their rivers. In fact, going as far as joining rivers across the country. What they have done in my opinion is beyond my worst nightmare. Artificial rocks, etc. etc. The worst thing is that the herons are leaving the river. That makes me so sad. They are such beautiful birds, and one of my favorite to photograph.

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